Low Hanging Fruit

One of the fundamental pieces of advice that I always bring with me in business is “Always pick the low-hanging fruit first“, this is a platitude as much as any, but there is some basic wisdom in it. Most people aspire to greatness, whether they admit this or not, and there are two major ways for a person to be recognized as great, doing something incredibly creative, or doing something incredibly complex. In recent years, this has tended to become even worse in that people take the technology approach which is: “Do something incredibly creative and complex“, which brings a whole string of new problems.

Complexity and creativity are two things that often land businesses in trouble, because people often want to be recognized for doing something revolutionary and people often view some creative as being more innovative if it also appears complex. They aspire to be the Steve Jobs of their industry before they’ve gotten their business off the ground. The idea behind the low hanging fruit is to do those things that are simple, uncomplicated, come at a low cost and risk, but promise safe, guaranteed returns before doing the things that offer greater returns but carry much higher risks.

For instance, if you are running a small manufacturing operation making pasta sauce, you can probably improve your bottom line by improving the production and distribution process incrementally, ensuring smooth operations throughout your value chain before attempting a market expansion. This accomplishes two things, first of all it ensures that you have control over the resource usage in your value chain, and secondly it removes barriers to scale. Many companies have tried to expand before they were ready to expand and it leads to a souring of relationships within their value chain due to either having to sacrifice product quality, being unable to deliver, or not being able to keep up with their inputs.

In the same way, many men who are new to the red pill tend to go after the big things, that come with equally big costs and risks first, rather than fixing the little problems. For obvious reasons, often we think that major changes give major results, and major effort has major effect. However, 10 small changes can often have much greater positive effects than one major change, for less effort at a lower risk. Furthermore, those many, small and easy changes serve to enable the big changes. Continue reading

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An Update on Black Label Logic

I took some time off for the past month after putting out a blog post a week, even two posts a week for a while during my high productivity periods and I actually sat around reflecting quite a bit on what I want to do going forward with this blog.

Richard Cooper of Entrepreneurs in Cars said something on a Red Man Group pre-show that I somewhat took to heart. Since we started doing The Red Man Group, I’ve done it just about every week for 2 – 3 hours, on top of spending a lot of time crafting my essays, especially those that require a lot of research, and statistics. On top of that I’m currently writing the next Gendernomics book that I expect will be out around December.

This is a heavy time investment, I calculated that I’ve written around 400.000 words just on the blog, and around 50.000 combined in Gendernomics and Gendernomics 2. I would like to be able to put more time into writing, because it’s something I very much enjoy doing, however what Rich said was “If you get paid like a hobby, you will treat it like a hobby“, so for that reason I’ve decided to expand into more sources of revenue for the Black Label Logic Project.

However, it’s not my style to ask for money without offering additional value, so here are the 3 new value propositions from Black Label Logic.  Continue reading

Of Online Game and Omnichannels

Those of you who read my essay on doing some AB testing on Tinder, will know that I’m quite a recent adopter of online dating apps. I did try some of the sites back in 2007 or 2008, but found it to be quite a wrenched hive of scum and villainy. I’ve always been more partial to day game, social circle game or night game as methods for meeting women, because you can screen your targets much more effectively, so fatfishing is more or less non-existent in those forms of game prior to 2 am at the bar when all bets are off.

The thing I’ve found is that styles of game are a lot like workout routines, people find one they like, stick with it, defend it zealously and regard anyone who has a different routine as having it just to insult them. I’ve always found this to be a rather non-pragmatic approach both to training and game.

I tend to take the approach that you should learn as much as you can, test as much as you are able and keep what is useful. To use an example I’ve got a weight training program and I have a body weight training program, I prefer the former but I use the latter for active recovery, rehabilitation after injury and when I’m unable to access a gym. Continue reading

Gendernomics: Products and Markets

Rollo recently posted an essay where he talks about the concept of value added, more specifically about a tendency among women to conflate their sexual market value with their worth as a human being. This is largely a function of women having reduced themselves to sexual commodities, and one key characteristics of a commodity in a market is that there is little if any differentiation. For instance, if I were to purchase aluminum ingots or oil in the spot market, no company really offers a differentiated product, they are all sold based on lowest cost. In the same manner, if the only  thing being “sold” in the sexual market place is the act of sex, one could argue that such a product is largely undifferentiated.

Naturally, for the act of sex one prefers a packaging that is aesthetically pleasing, this goes for both men and women. In today’s online sexual market place, it doesn’t matter much how great your personality is, as most purchasing processes start with determining whether a product passes the hurdle rate for appearance, and then if it does one explores other product features.

Much of product design is based on an idea for a product, and then after the idea generation and prototyping phases, one comes up with the value proposition to the market. My preference is to begin with a market analysis, and then creating the product, in order to ensure that will be customers for the product. It is generally also much cheaper to conduct market research than it is to develop products. From this approach, one can develop a good sense of the market in which one will operate, and which product characteristics are important to the potential customer base. One can even identify the price ceiling, potential volumes and various other important input to the product design process.

If one compares Vodka to Whiskey for instance, the former is ethanol and water, the latter is also ethanol and water, but the process of production has a large influence on the end-product. Vodka is differentiated 90% using brand building and marketing. Whiskey is differentiated in the same manner, however, much of the marketing is based on differences in the production process. These differences range from the grain bill (malt, rye, corn, etc), malt processing (peat levels), type of distillation (pot still or column still) time spent cask aging, type of casks that the whiskey has been aged in, and single malt vs. blended. Continue reading

Of Syllogisms and Suppositions

Back when I got my first corporate job I was very much an idealist when it came to the corporate environment. I had faith in that if I simply worked hard, did a solid job and demonstrated my value to the company I worked for back then, I would have a great career ahead of me. A couple of years of not taking vacations, putting in 80 hours a week every week, answering calls and emails around the clock later, I was still in the exact same position that I was in when I started. I’d gotten a few pay raises but that was about it. As I spent my birthday reflecting on that year’s accounts, I started thinking of expectancy and equity theory. The basics of these two theories is that people form cause and effect chains, “if I do X, then Y” (expectancy) and they expect people to maintain equitable relationships, meaning “if I produce value above my current salary to the company, the company will reward me for it“, however this can often not be the case, because there is no clear cause-effect chain between doing a great job and climbing the corporate ladder.

In my case, I expected the company to recognize my efforts and reward me with what I desired. This is not much different from how many men will be perfect husbands on paper, they provide, they are great fathers, treat their wife as the center of their world, they contribute to the community and if asked nobody would have a problem saying “Oh, he’s a great guy”. They expect that if they do all the things right, for instance they fill their wife’s 487 bullet-point list, they are great dads, they communicate, they do chores and so on, their wife will return the equity to them in the form of sex and devotion, yet many of them find themselves in dead bedrooms or getting zeroed out.

It’s no different from how many Good Boys will work hard their entire lives, sacrifice their teens and twenties to become great husbands to a woman who has partied her way through life. Then they expect this woman to recognize their efforts and reward them with what they desire. It’s a covert contract on a grand scale.

Continue reading

The Engineer’s Dilemma

I spent most of this week writing on what I figured would be this week’s essay, then late last night I thought of this topic. I read and consume a bit of red pill content, because I find it interesting, I like supporting the other content creators in the sphere, I learn from it and like this week I got a bit of inspiration. I consumed 2 major pieces of content this week, I watched Rich Cooper’s speech at last years 21 Convention and I read Alan Roger Currie’s book “Mode One“. I just got to know Rich when we started doing The Red Man Group, and I was not very familiar with Alan, except for a Podcast he did with Donovan [3]  a while back, but I’m glad I took the time to consume their content this week.

Both men have a similar over-arching theme to these pieces of work that is very familiar to me from my work with start-ups. In my experience, entrepreneurs often come in two types, there is the salesman and the engineer. Both groups can make very successful companies, however the problems they face are often quite different. The salesman comes up with an idea for a business and as he prefers doing sales, that’s where he begins. Over a fairly short period of time he may amass a lot of orders, sign quite a few contracts, then when it becomes time to deliver the product he has no idea what to do next. The help that the salesman often needed was structuring up his value chain, handling the administrative work, product development, logistics, production and other parts of the day to day operations.

The engineer type on the other hand comes up with an idea for a product, and he immediately starts work on making a prototype. He often spends a ton of time working out every kink in the product, setting up production, figuring out how to handle his value chain and his logistics. However, he would end up very far into the hole because he never really got around to thinking about who his market is, how to bring the product to market or how to get sales. Continue reading

Gendernomics: The Tinder Picture Experiment

To give the background for the experiment, I’ve never been much into online dating because when I started practicing game, the only material was largely centered on clubs. I’ve been using day-game quite a lot over the past few years because I travel a lot for my day job and often end up spending 5 days to two weeks in a location. However, lately I’ve found it a challenge to do day game due to spending less time in a city, having fewer repeat visits and having to compress the process into a much shorter time period.

I noticed that Anthony (@beachmuscles) was having a lot of success using various online platforms including Tinder, and concluded that this could be a very useful avenue for me as well and I don’t like leaving pussy on the table. I’ve also noticed a trend where people tend to go out more in groups, or on already planned dates, as opposed to going out just to meet people, so it seems that the internet has lead to distribution and logistics innovations in the sexual market place as well.

The first issue I ran into when I downloaded Tinder was to find good pictures of myself, I’ve had photography as a hobby for years but I’ve never spent much time in front of a camera, and I don’t really have a lot of pictures of myself suitable for a dating profile. I also know that people tend to be very poor judges of their own pictures, so I figured that I had to find a way to get 3 – 5 good pictures of myself.

This was what caused me to conduct this experiment because in absence of other pictures, I used my professional headshots for my Tinder profile along with filling out the default spaces in the profile including my alma matter and my job title, then overwhelmingly got responses from women ages 30 – 35 with professional jobs and University degrees. This is hardly my ideal demographic, so being that I know a thing or two about red pill theory I formulated an experiment. It was only intended to give me insight into online dating in general, and Tinder in particular, but when I mentioned it on The Red Man Group many men requested a write up, so here we go. Continue reading