Red Pill Logic: Beyond Red and Blue Pills

Lately it seems that there is some discussion regarding when to move on from the red pill. As someone who found the manosphere quite early, was a part of it for a while, left and then came back I found myself thinking about this idea. There is no doubt that everything we encounter in life is either a permanent fixture or a transitory element, meaning that some things stick with us for life, other things are part of our life for a while and are then left behind. To use weight training as an example, if you build your body over time, then you can maintain it with much less effort than it took to build. Yet if you completely neglect it, it will slowly crumble over time. This is similar with most skills, if they are not used, then they atrophy over time until we find ourselves not having the skills at all. Depending on the skill and the length of the atrophy period, one may be able to re-learn the skill rather quickly, or it may take just as long as the initial learning period.

This lead to the question, if a man internalizes red pill teachings will they remain with him in sufficient strength to avoid the very pitfalls that lead him to the manosphere in the first place? One must keep in mind that most men arrive at this corner of the internet because they have problems they need to solve, the problems are many and diverse, what they have in common is intersexual dynamics. Whether a man is attempting to figure out why his wife of 10 or more years left him for a guy she met a few weeks ago, why he is in a 5 year dry-spell, or why he is living in a dead-bedroom situation the manosphere can offer probable diagnosis and potential cures. Continue reading

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Gendernomics: Curves and Complications

SMV Curve from Therationalmale.com

The SMV graph by Rollo Tomassi has become one of the cornerstones of Red Pill theory. The chart demonstrates the development of the sexual market value for men and women across time. The graph is quite information dense, and the major difference between the sexes is that as male sexual market value is built, not given. Men need time to build their value. Women on the other hand are given much of their value at birth, discounted due to risk until the value manifest. It is for this reason that I’ve often described female sexual market value as being similar to a financial instrument called an option, while male sexual market value is more similar to a corporate share value.

The graph is probabilistic in that it does not outright state that every man will reach an SMV of 10 at around age 35, and every woman will reach an SMV of 10 in her early twenties, it states that this is the time, ceteris paribus that each sex has the highest probability of reaching the highest SMV they will have in their life. A man who does many of the wrong things between the ages of 15 and 35 cannot expect that his sexual market value will be higher at 35 than at 20. A woman, may not experience her peak until her late 20s, or perhaps experience it in her late teens depending on circumstance.

As I spoke about in my series “On Value“, it is important that we know the distinction between a deterministic view (It will be so) and a probabilistic one (It is likely to be so). For this reason I’ve tended to view the SMV graph in terms of being the time in life where a given sex has both the highest possible value multiplier and the highest amount of beneficial effects applied to them. For instance a man in his mid-thirties has the beneficial effect of being attractive to the broadest possible demographic of women, he has had a decade or two to mature, improve and build himself up. Yet, time has not yet done much damage to his appearance and he has hopefully regained some of his faculties after being dominated by the little head since puberty.

In order to exemplify possible sexual market developments for men, I created 3 theoretical men from broad categories that are often observed in the wild. There is the classical “Early Peak”, “The Norm” and “Late bloomer”. These all have different curves as a result of a mixture of choice and natural proclivities. For instance many of the men who develop a high sexual market value in their teens and twenties do so in part due to good genetics, related to build, height, psychological factors and interests in things that offer social proof such as artistic or athletic endeavors. Continue reading

Gendernomics: On Value Part 5

This is the 5th and final part of a 5 part essay. Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4

My reason behind writing this essay was to demonstrate the many factors  that goes into determining a person’s sexual market value, and why one will never be able to create an iron-clad framework to ensure 100% success rate. While some argue that economics is perhaps not the ideal system to apply to the mating market, due to the irrational nature of human mating decisions, I do not consider human mating decisions to be irrational. In my view, humans act in the mating market as rational actors, meaning that they are goal oriented, reflective and consistent as opposed to being irrational, namely random, impulsive, conditioned or imitative [1]. For example, most people tend to have a “type” of partner that they display a preference for, which demonstrates consistency. There is a tendency for people to act in a goal oriented manner seeking out partners based on a range of characteristics such as relationship type, partner type or various others. People tend to reflect as they gain experience on which characteristics they do not want in a partner as well as which characteristics they want, which demonstrates reflective evaluation.

If partner choice was truly a case of being random, impulsive, conditioned and based on imitation, one would not expect to see many if any patterns, yet every piece of advice written on how to improve ones romantic life is based on the observation of patterns. However, one must keep in mind that rational behavior as per rational choice theory, is not the same as conscious and deliberate behavior. When an economist uses the term “The rational actor” he is not stating that people consciously sit down and compare the specifications of every single vacuum cleaner that is available to them, list out their choice criteria in a bullet point list, weigh them out, evaluate each product against the choice criteria and his budget for a new vacuum cleaner. He is stating that people evaluate their options and elect the one that is utility maximizing often subconsciously, and demonstrate a preference over time.

My goal was to elaborate on some of the underlying factors that affect such largely sub-conscious evaluations that we conduct every single day and that affect our mating behaviors. As I was writing this essay, it started to become clear that creating an iron-clad, objective system for valuation within the sexual market place is somewhat of an impossibility. While it is entirely possible to outline the major variables that will be involved on both sides in such an equation, and while it is also possible to understand the aggregate level strategies of both men and women, the interaction between variables is infinitely complex. Furthermore, the inherent limitations of rational choice theory, have been covered by authors such as Daniel Kahneman and other researchers into decision theory, and to put this in the terms Kahneman utilizes in his book “Thinking fast and Thinking slow”, a majority of mating decisions are most likely made using system 1. [2] Continue reading