Gendernomics: The NAxALT Error

I briefly covered the NxALT error in an earlier essay on “AWALT” (all women are like that), but as it seems to be catching on in various domains relevant to, or sphere adjacent, it is time for a dedicated essay. Whenever I view characteristics of a population, I tend to make the initial assumption that it follows a normal distribution similar to the bell curve depicted in this essay.

Such a distribution is characterized by the fact that the values cluster around the mean, and the further away one gets from the mean, the smaller the population will be. For instance, in regards to IQ, 68% of the population are within 1 standard deviation either above or below the mean, meaning that they have an IQ in the range 85 – 115. 95% of the population are within 2 standard deviations either above or below the mean, meaning an IQ in the range 70 – 130. When one enters the outliers, meaning an IQ either below below 70 or above 130, this totals a mere 4.2% of the population. The extreme outliers, those people with an IQ either above 145 or below 55, are a mere 2% of the total population.

The normal distribution is present in many observations of human traits, height, weight and IQ being among them. In Gendernomics I argue  that sexual market value should be viewed as  a normal distribution, as this would be the distribution that ensured the maximal chance of “pairing off” when one takes hypergamy and the female pareto attraction into account. If all men are 10s, then it becomes impossible for hypergamy to select the highest value males, likewise if all women are 10s, then it becomes impossible for women to ensure that they have optimized hypergamy.

To summarize, in a normal distribution the majority of observations are within 1 – 2 standard deviations of the mean value, and the further one gets away from the mean the lower the amount of observations one makes. Thus it follows, that the probability of making an observation that is within 1 – 2 standard deviations of the mean is much higher than to observe an outlier. Continue reading

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Red Pill Logic: Of AWALT and Snowflakes

snowflakeNot all women are like that” is a statement that most of us get in response when we present certain red pill ideas to men or women who are firmly anchored within the social narrative of relationships. Usually this is presented as a response when pointing out typical female behaviors such as branch swinging, solipsism, or hypergamy that have a tendency to cast females in somewhat of a negative light compared to their permanent state on the pedestal within the narrative.

This reaction is understandable as it challenges many deeply ingrained super-ego rules that we have internalized, in addition to many men having significant ego investment in their sexual strategy. Often the challenge has its roots in “I know a woman who is not like that” or “My mother is not like that“, which assumes that every woman manifests the same traits and behaviors to the exact same degree throughout her life.

In this essay I will argue that AWALT is more similar to a diagnostic construct in the field of psychology than it is to a law of nature in the hard sciences. Psychological diagnostic constructs are lists of traits and behaviors that manifest within this construct. Narcissistic personality disorder includes: Grandiosity, power fantasies, self-perception of being unique, needing admiration, sense of entitlement, interpersonal exploitation, unwillingness to empathize with others, intensely envious of others and a pompous demeanor. In order to receive the diagnosis one must manifest traits beyond a given threshold, for instance 5 out of 9.

Depending on situation, one can also manifest these traits in varying frequencies and intensity that changes with context and over time. Thus a person may be diagnosed one time, and not diagnosed the next time.

Continue reading